New Mechanism that Triggers Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis Discovered

Scientists believe that certain synovial cells contribute to inflammation by activating synovial fibroblasts in people who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). They believe that having a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of inflammation in the disease is important for designing new therapies for RA.

In a study published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, points to synovial CD4+ T cells that produce IL-21 as the contributing factor to joint inflammation when they trigger synovial fibroblasts. 

“Patients with rheumatoid arthritis with active disease (inflamed joints) have difficulty for instance in using their hands and also with walking,” said Maria Cristina Lebre, Ph.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Academic Medical Center at the University of Amsterdam, Department of Experimental Immunology in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.



“Patients with rheumatoid arthritis with active disease (inflamed joints) have difficulty for instance in using their hands and also with walking,” said Maria Cristina Lebre, Ph.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Academic Medical Center at the University of Amsterdam, Department of Experimental Immunology in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Read more here. 


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